New teacher profiles 2012-2013

Matt Gottschling- AP U.S. History and World History (gold)

Matt Gottschiling may be found in found in the A203 porch and talking about his most acquired interest, history. Ever since he was little, Gottschiling has found a positive pull towards the subject of history due to its worldly and well-rounded features.

“History involves everything arts and literature,” Gottschling said.

Gottschling has adapted to the West Linn High School community and to starting his career at West Linn. He is in awe of the supportive attitudes that he has received from his fellow staff, administration and student’s parents. Before he moved to Flagstaff, AZ he taught as a substitute teacher in West Linn-Wilsonville School District. Even after he left, he was intrigued by the WLWV community, so when he found the job opening, he saw a great opportunity and a convenient challange.

Gottshiling hopes to inspire students to “do their best and set a good foundation for the rest of their lives. Kids need to take advantage of such a great school and never needs to be afraid of asking for help,” he said.


Jessica Wray- English, sophomores and seniors

After loving English through her her high school and college careers, Jessica Wray is excited to start teaching and passing on her knowledge to her students. She looks forward to learning from her students as well, while they discuss and view things differently in different perspectives.

She feels extremely comfortable and at home. Not only is she a former WLHS student but had the opportunity to be a student teacher with Andy West in 2008-2010. After student teaching she knew she wanted to teach at a school like WLHS. Wray is coming into the year enthusiastically, planning to teach her students the beauty of literature and hopes they gain the same appreciation for it as she has. She emphasizes the quote from the John Keating in Dead Poet Society, “No matter what anybody tells you, words and ideas can change the world.”

 

Teale Iacolucci-Math
Teale Iacolucci, Math Teacher, is happy to tap her Lion roots and become part of WLHS. When given the opportunity to teach here she knew it was the right calling because her grandpa and mother went here.

“I already have Lion in my blood,” Iacolucci said.

She is ecstatic to be working at West Linn and loves the sense of community.  After student-teaching with Tina Laferriere, Iacolucci is glad to begin her second year at WLHS. She said that Laferriere was the best mentor and was soon given the chance to teach the summer Trigonometry class. During her summer teachings at WLHS she was given the opportunity to attend three different interviews. Her nerves were calmed by her students who were “very supportive and comforting through the whole process.”

In high school, Iacolucci earned an appreciation for math through her teacher who presented her with the amazing opportunities numbers bring. While teaching,she aspires to show her students the different possibilities and uses for numbers.

“I want to invest the same love in numbers and show my students the same possibilities numbers bring as my high school teacher showed me,” Iacolucci said.

Starting off the year strong, Iacolucci looks forward to much more to come: “prepared for anything, excited to learn and grow and be a Lion.”


Alex Close-English, freshman and juniors

As a teen, Alex Close, English teacher, used writing as a distraction. Close has been very dedicated to writing and literature through high school and college. With a strong writing background, before coming to teaching Close worked as a journalist reporting for sports.

In his beginning years of teaching, Close is  inspired to instill his students the appreciation he has for writing. West Linn High School has always drawn Close’s attention because he grew up in the area and his wife is an alumni. He looks forward to working with his freshman and junior classes and hopes to “turn kids on to using English as a therapy and release.”

While teaching, Close emphasizes balance and wishes to demonstrate the feeling of being happy and successful and show his students fun, work and responsibility come hand and hand.


Julie Holson- Special Education Teacher


Julie Holson can be found in the Special Education Resource center  lending a helping hand. Holson works in the applied academic program, spending most of her time helping students fill in the holes in their education with foundation classes for math, English and history.
Holson is passionate about independent living fpr students dealing with challenges. After working with the disabled in the past she has learned to push herself and her patients to the “ah-ha moment and feeling.”
“It is very rewarding and makes both of us feel accomplished.” Holson said.
Holson has worked in the for the past ten years at Athey Creek Middle School. When she saw the job offer at WLHS, she thought of it as an opportunity to impact young adults. Holson appreciates the support and attitudes of the staff and the students.
“It’s the best community, has the best attitude, and is warm and welcoming. You feel included in the community right away; it’s awesome.” Holson said.
Through her teachings Holson plans to impact and benefit her students in different ways.
“I encourage everyone to include others and extend the role of friendship, lend a helping hand and to put a smile on everyone’s face.” Holson said.

Brian Schott- French-Long-Term Sub

After touring the regions of France straight out of college for two years, Brian Schott, French teacher, hopes to impact his students in the same ways the French culture has impacted him. As Erin O’Malley’s fill-in for the semester, due to O’Malley’s maternity leave, Schott looks forward to becoming a part of the West Linn community and is intrigued by the welcoming demeanor of our school.

“I love the kids here, they are willing to work so hard,” Schott said.

Through studying French in high school and abroad in college, Schott has gained respect for many of the French values. He is inspired by their attitudes towards life and the emphasis they put on friendship and how they savour everything.

“They interact with a much slower pace and take the time to enjoy everything; they gather around during meals and take time to socialize for two hours.” Schott said.

As he teaches during his classes and coaches offensive freshman football, Schott hopes to spread the awareness of how much French is used around the world. He hopes to show students how to be “Je suis un bon vivant,” someone who lives life to the fullest.