Be transported into a world of the 1960s at the A.P. United States History Museum.

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Be transported into a world of the 1960s at the A.P. United States History Museum.

Jillian Emken, 10, works on her A.P. U.S. History Museum project.

Jillian Emken, 10, works on her A.P. U.S. History Museum project.

Brittany Park

Jillian Emken, 10, works on her A.P. U.S. History Museum project.

Brittany Park

Brittany Park

Jillian Emken, 10, works on her A.P. U.S. History Museum project.

The second annual A.P U.S. History Museum will take place tomorrow night at 7 p.m. in the Commons. The museum will feature many projects which span across the decade of the 1960s, including a fashion show, a re-creation of the Berlin Wall, and a game of Jeopardy.

Run by all three of Matt Gottschling’s APUSH classes, this student-led project will enrich many in the historically filled decade of the 60s.

Each class has a president and vice president who are responsible for organizing their individual classes projects. Fourth period vice president Nathan Barinstein, sophomore, is very excited for people to experience the museum.

“It’s is a very exciting way to see a glimpse of all aspects of 1960s culture,” Barinstein said. “This was a very exciting time that shaped the modern world, such as popular music and advertisements.”

Chelsea Lin, sophomore, is recreating the Berlin Wall, by stacking styrofoam.

“I found this topic very interesting, and wanted to educate people about the Berlin Wall because it was such an important part in history,“ Lin said. “The wall will be put together and throughout the night it will be taken apart brick by brick.”

These projects will capture the events and culture of  the 60s. Some of these projects include the Kennedy Assasination, the counterculture movement, the Civil Rights movement, the Vietnam War and a re-creation of a 1960s home.

“We just want people to come and be excited and engaged in these projects,“ Barinstein said. “We hope that people will learn a lot from this unique experience.”

 

 

 

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